Things Bibliophiles are Wont to Do

January 24, 2017

BuzzFeed Books has posted to the Intertubes this delightful video of things every booklover will instantly recognize as What We Do As a Matter of Course. Enjoy!

Found via Bookaholics’ Facebook page


Where We Read

January 8, 2017

reader-painting

Over at Literary Hub, booklover Michele Filgate notes that no matter what we read, or when, or why, we always do our best reading in very specific places. Often even in very specific postures.

Filgate muses on the significance of where she does her own best reading. She also quotes several other booklovers on their own conclusions about this inescapable but underdiscussed matter.

Enjoy.

Found at LitHub’s Facebook page


Reading Books May Lengthen Your Life

January 4, 2017

Elderly man with beard and hat reading in a park

According to a study published in September 2016, people who read books – not newspapers, not magazines, but books – lived for an average of almost two years longer than those who didn’t. The study involved over 3,000 retirees and was conducted by researchers at Yale University.

Found at The Week, December 10, 2016, page 26

 


“On the Heartbreaking Difficulty of Getting Rid of Books”

May 23, 2016

stack_of_books

Over at Literary Hub, blogger Summer Brennan thoughtfully examines whether it makes sense to apply the clutter-ridding principls espoused in Marie Kondo’s bestselling The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up to one’s personal book collection.

The comments of readers of Brennan’s essay are as thoughtful as the essay itself.

Whatever you think about this dilemma, I think we can all agree that hanging onto or getting rid of books is far from a rational process.

This is definitely one of the best essays on this topic I have read. A bonus is Brennan’s hyperlinked list of nonprofit agencies that will accept any books you do decide to “let go of” in any of your impulsive or long-put-off purges. (And don’t forget your local public library, most of which also accept donated books in decent condition.)

Found at Sue Searing’s Facebook page


Reading While Waiting

March 29, 2016

Reading-Time-Clock

Most booklovers I’ve met have long since discovered one or more of these ways to eke out a little more reading time in their daily schedules. But it’s handy to see a comprehensive list, compiled approximately a year ago by Cassandra Neace.

Found at a Facebook post by The Goodwill Librarian, via Book Riot


Reading More: A Modest Proposal

March 21, 2016

The Dramatist by Brigit Ganley (1909-2002)

Blogger Shane Parrish has done the math, and here’s his straighforward plan for tackling those Worthy-But-Lengthy Classics many of us booklovers never seem to get around to reading.

Found at the blog Get Old; link posted to Facebook by Atlanta booklover Mary Starck

 


Spying on Other People’s Bookshelves

August 17, 2015

11-07-2008-home-library-14

From Theodore Dalrymple’s The Pleasure of Thinking: A Journey Through the Sideways Leaps of Ideas (Gibson Square Books, 2012):

“I know many people who, when they enter a house for the first time, are inclined (even if they control themselves) to go straight up to the bookshelves to find out what their hosts are made of: for taste is a more reliable guide to character than opinion. I am like this: I control myself, but in a room with a substantial number of books I feel a tension mounting in myself until I have found out what they are. Indeed, I often fake or manufacture a reason for sidling up to them, and examining them out of the corner of my eye.”

Quoted by Patrick Krup at his blog Anecdotal Evidence